Reminder Avoidance: Why People Hesitate to Disclose Their Insecurities to Friends

Five studies (all pre-registered) show that when disclosing personal insecurities (vs. other neutral or negative personal information), people decrease their tendency to prefer friends to strangers for self-disclosure. This effect occurs because people believe friends are more likely than strangers to trigger painful reminders of disclosed content – their insecurities.



Citation:

Soo Kim, Peggy Liu, and Kate E. Min (2020) ,"Reminder Avoidance: Why People Hesitate to Disclose Their Insecurities to Friends", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 847-850.

Authors

Soo Kim, Cornell University, USA
Peggy Liu, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Kate E. Min, Cornell University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

D10. It's Meant for Me: When Serendipity Increases Word-of-Mouth

Colleen Patricia Kirk, New York Institute of Technology
Joann Peck, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Claire Hart, University of South Hampton, UK
Constantine Sedikides, University of South Hampton, UK

Read More

Featured

Brand movement

Andrea Lucarelli, Lund University
Gregorio Fuschillo, Kedge Business School
Jon Bertilsson, Lund University

Read More

Featured

Trust in Doubt: Co-Chair's Invited Panel

Adam Berinsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
John Gray, MentionMapp.com
Andre Spicer, City University of London, UK

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.