Guidelines on Acquiescence in Marketing Research

We review the acquiescence response bias -- its origin, its effects on marketing research, and existing measures to avoid effects of acquiescence on self-report data. Based on this analysis, we develop guidelines for marketing researchers for using existing measures against acquiescence or adapting surveys to prevent biased responses.



Citation:

Janina Steinmetz and Ann-Christin Posten (2020) ,"Guidelines on Acquiescence in Marketing Research", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48, eds. Jennifer Argo, Tina M. Lowrey, and Hope Jensen Schau, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 712-711.

Authors

Janina Steinmetz, City University of London, UK
Ann-Christin Posten, University of Cologne



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 48 | 2020



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