The Minimal Interactivity Effect: the Role of Thought Speed in the Evaluation and Consumption

We demonstrate the power of minimal interactivity, in the form of exercising control, on digital experiences. Four studies provide converging evidence that minimal interactivity enhances evaluation and can increase media consumption by 45%. We explain this using the concept of thought speed and illustrate how it affects consumers.



Citation:

Shirley S. Chen and Kyle B. Murray (2019) ,"The Minimal Interactivity Effect: the Role of Thought Speed in the Evaluation and Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 377-379.

Authors

Shirley S. Chen, University of Alberta, Canada
Kyle B. Murray, University of Alberta, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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