The Ally Effect: the Role of Implicit and Explicit Cues in Advertising Towards Marginalized Groups

Within consumer research, little is known about the attitudes of allies, or consumers who hold favorable attitudes towards a marginalized out-group. In two studies, we find that allies prefer explicit marginalized group signals over implicit, leading to higher evaluations of the ad and company, if the company support seems authentic.



Citation:

Abigail Jean Nappier Cherup and Meike Eilert (2019) ,"The Ally Effect: the Role of Implicit and Explicit Cues in Advertising Towards Marginalized Groups", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 62-67.

Authors

Abigail Jean Nappier Cherup, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Meike Eilert, University of Kentucky, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Marketing’s Ethical Blind Spot: The Problem with Catering to Customer Preferences

Suneal Bedi, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Sonu Bedi, Dartmouth College, USA

Read More

Featured

Cultivating Collaboration and Value Cocreation in Consumption Journeys

Melissa Archpru Akaka, University of Denver
Hope Schau, University of Arizona, USA

Read More

Featured

Stigma at Every Turn: Exploring Bi+ Consumer Experiences

Abigail Jean Nappier Cherup, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Andre F. Maciel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.