When Experiences Go Badly: the Buffering Effect of Scheduling on Dissatisfaction

The author proposes that scheduling can reduce dissatisfaction when an experience goes badly. Six studies demonstrate that consumers expect to be more satisfied with scheduled (vs. impromptu) experiences, and this higher anchor leads to greater satisfaction and positive word of mouth when something goes poorly within an experience.



Citation:

Gabriela Tonietto (2019) ,"When Experiences Go Badly: the Buffering Effect of Scheduling on Dissatisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 337-341.

Authors

Gabriela Tonietto, Rutgers University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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