Does Choice Produce an Illusion of Control?

An influential literature suggests that choice induces an illusion of control. For example, research suggests that people are more optimistic about their chances of winning a lottery when they choose the tickets themselves. We repeatedly find no evidence for this. Choice increases perceived control only when it increases actual control.



Citation:

Joowon Klusowski, Deborah Small, and Joseph P. Simmons (2019) ,"Does Choice Produce an Illusion of Control?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 337-341.

Authors

Joowon Klusowski, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Deborah Small, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Joseph P. Simmons, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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