1F Preferences For Ambivalent Products As a Function of “Too Good to Be True” Beliefs

Despite most products requiring explicit tradeoffs, consumers feel ambivalent when products perform well on one dimension but poorly on another. We show that relative experts (the most profitable and influential customers) best understand such tradeoffs and thus deem seemingly perfectly positive products as “too good to be true.”



Citation:

Geoffrey Durso and Robert Smith (2019) ,"1F Preferences For Ambivalent Products As a Function of “Too Good to Be True” Beliefs", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 967-967.

Authors

Geoffrey Durso, Vanderbilt University, USA
Robert Smith, Ohio State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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