Living on the Edge? Political Extremeness and Normalizing Consumption

Political ideology has an impact on and is partially determined by consumption practices. Ideology differs not only by polarity (liberal vs. conservative), but also by extremeness. We show that political extremeness enhances preference for popular products as a remedy to the ostracizing effect of one's extreme political views.



Citation:

Aaron Charlton, Joshua T. Beck, and Joshua J. Clarkson (2019) ,"Living on the Edge? Political Extremeness and Normalizing Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 504-505.

Authors

Aaron Charlton, University of Oregon, USA
Joshua T. Beck, University of Oregon, USA
Joshua J. Clarkson, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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