Dimensions of Altruism: Do Evaluations of Charitable Behavior Track Prosocial Benefit Or Personal Sacrifice?

Do people praise altruistic acts because they involve a personal cost or because they help society? Three studies demonstrate that evaluations of prosocial acts track the costs, but not benefits, of those acts. These results support a signaling account of moral behavior and have implications for charitable giving.



Citation:

Samuel Johnson (2019) ,"Dimensions of Altruism: Do Evaluations of Charitable Behavior Track Prosocial Benefit Or Personal Sacrifice?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 673-673.

Authors

Samuel Johnson, University of Bath, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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