Tmi: How and Why Personal Self-Disclosure Affects the Persuasiveness of Consumer Word-Of-Mouth

We demonstrate that reviewers’ sharing of intimate personal information can negatively affect WOM value. We suggest and show that this is due to readers’ perceptions of reviewers’ personal disclosure as socially inappropriate. This perception lowers readers’ liking for the reviewer, thereby reducing persuasiveness of the review and product purchase likelihood.



Citation:

Carter Morgan, Zoey Chen, and Sara Loughran Dommer (2019) ,"Tmi: How and Why Personal Self-Disclosure Affects the Persuasiveness of Consumer Word-Of-Mouth", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 227-231.

Authors

Carter Morgan, University of Miami, USA
Zoey Chen, University of Miami, USA
Sara Loughran Dommer, Georgia Tech, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Memory-Based Models of Predicting Inferences about Brand Quality

Yvetta Simonyan, University of Bath, UK
Dan Goldstein, Microsoft Research

Read More

Featured

Boomerang Effect: How Sustainable Disposal Options Spur Green Consumers to Overconsume

Sommer Kapitan, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Saerom Lee, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Eunjoo Han, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Read More

Featured

L14. Christmas Decorations in September – What Happened to Halloween? The Effect of Prospective Event Markers on Time Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Promotions

Chaumanix Dutton, University of Southern California, USA
Kristin Diehl, University of Southern California, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.