Choosing Targets: How Expectations of Qualitative Change Influence Word of Mouth

Five experiments show that consumers prefer to direct persuasion efforts toward individuals who would shift their attitudes qualitatively (e.g., from negative to positive) rather than non-qualitatively (e.g., from positive to more positive), because qualitative change is perceived as greater and expected to have more impact on behavior.



Citation:

Christopher Bechler, Zakary Tormala, and Derek Rucker (2019) ,"Choosing Targets: How Expectations of Qualitative Change Influence Word of Mouth", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 227-231.

Authors

Christopher Bechler, Stanford University, USA
Zakary Tormala, Stanford University, USA
Derek Rucker, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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