When Virtual Reality Backfires on Reality: Vr Reduces High Sensation Seekers’ Desire For Stimulation

Studying the downside of Virtual Reality (VR) experiences, we find that providing stimulation in VR decreases highly sensation-seeking consumers’ subsequent preference for similar, stimulating consumption activities and advertisements in physical reality. The effect is mitigated when experiences in virtual and physical reality satisfy dissimilar (vs. similar) consumer needs.



Citation:

Youjung Jun, Jaeyeon Chung, and Gita Venkataramani Johar (2019) ,"When Virtual Reality Backfires on Reality: Vr Reduces High Sensation Seekers’ Desire For Stimulation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 217-221.

Authors

Youjung Jun, Columbia University, USA
Jaeyeon Chung, Rice University, USA
Gita Venkataramani Johar, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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