14L to Err Is (Not) Human: Examining Beliefs About Errors Made By Artificial Intelligence

Prior research finds that consumers are reluctant to rely on artificial intelligence (AI) to make decisions. This research proposes a lay-theory account to explain this aversion. Two studies show that consumers think AI lacks the ability to distinguish different types of errors, and this belief prevents them from adopting AI.



Citation:

May Xinyu Yuan, Noah VanBergen, Bryan Buechner, Daniel M Grossman, and Caglar Irmak (2019) ,"14L to Err Is (Not) Human: Examining Beliefs About Errors Made By Artificial Intelligence", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1002-1002.

Authors

May Xinyu Yuan, University of Miami, USA
Noah VanBergen, University of Cincinnati, USA
Bryan Buechner, University of Cincinnati, USA
Daniel M Grossman, University of Cincinnati, USA
Caglar Irmak, University of Miami, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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