The Bulletproof Glass Effect: the Ironic Impact of Privacy Policies on Perceived Security and Purchase Intent

Although bulletproof glass offers real protection, it can ironically cause people to become more aware of surrounding dangers and paradoxically feel less safe than they would in its absence. Similarly, four studies show that salient privacy policies can decrease perceived security and purchase intent compared to offering no privacy protection.



Citation:

Aaron Brough, David Norton, and Leslie John (2019) ,"The Bulletproof Glass Effect: the Ironic Impact of Privacy Policies on Perceived Security and Purchase Intent", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 40-44.

Authors

Aaron Brough, Utah State University, USA
David Norton, University of Connecticut, USA
Leslie John, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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