Self-Regulation and Consumer Impatience

This research finds that self-regulation is an important source of intertemporal impatience. Five experiments show that performing self-regulation makes time more salient, thus time intervals are perceived as longer and impatience is increased. This also leads to time-related product features (e.g., speed) being perceived as more important.



Citation:

Hyoje (Jay) Kim, Hyun Seung Jin, Chris Janiszewski, Clinton S. Weeks, and Amanda T. Beatson (2019) ,"Self-Regulation and Consumer Impatience", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 169-174.

Authors

Hyoje (Jay) Kim, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Hyun Seung Jin, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Chris Janiszewski, University of Florida, USA
Clinton S. Weeks, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Amanda T. Beatson, Queensland University of Technology, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

R9. The Asymmetric Effects Of Attitude Toward The Brand (Symbolic Vs. Functional) Upon Recommendation System (Artificial Intelligence Vs. Human)

Kiwan Park, Seoul National University, USA
Yaeri Kim, Seoul National University, USA
Seojin Stacey Lee, Seoul National University, USA

Read More

Featured

P5. Can(Can’t) Control, thus Try to Save (Earn): The Joint Effect of Perceived Control and Financial Deprivation on Financial Decisions

Min Jung Kim, Manhattan College

Read More

Featured

How Mortality Salience Shapes Consumers’ Responses to Brands

Polina Landgraf, IE Business School, IE University
Antonios Stamatogiannakis, IE Business School, IE University
Haiyang Yang, Johns Hopkins University

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.