11C the Curse of Similarity: How Similarity Can Help Or Hurt Persuasiveness

We study how the similarity between consumers and salespersons affects persuasiveness. Four studies and secondary data demonstrate that consumers more likely take a recommendation from a similar (vs. dissimilar) salesperson when purchasing an unfamiliar product, but the reverse is true when purchasing a familiar product.



Citation:

Suntong Qi, Xianchi Dai, and Canice Man Ching Kwan (2019) ,"11C the Curse of Similarity: How Similarity Can Help Or Hurt Persuasiveness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 987-987.

Authors

Suntong Qi, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Xianchi Dai, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Canice Man Ching Kwan, Open University of Hong Kong, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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