Mistaking Minds and Machines: How Speech Affects Dehumanization and Anthropomorphism

Treating a human like a machine is dehumanizing, whereas treating a machine like a human is anthropomorphizing. Four experiments demonstrate that a cue closely connected to a person’s actual mental experience—a humanlike voice—affects the likelihood of mistaking a person for a machine, or a machine for a person.



Citation:

Juliana Schroeder and Nicholas Epley (2019) ,"Mistaking Minds and Machines: How Speech Affects Dehumanization and Anthropomorphism", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 259-264.

Authors

Juliana Schroeder, University of California Berkeley, USA
Nicholas Epley, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Handshaking Promotes Deal-Making By Signaling Cooperative Intent

Juliana Schroeder, University of California Berkeley, USA
Jane Risen, University of Chicago, USA
Francesca Gino, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

Visualizing Price Magnitude: How Slider Scales Change Willingness-to-Pay

Manoj Thomas, Cornell University, USA
Ellie Kyung, Dartmouth College, USA

Read More

Featured

Nostalgiacising: A Performative Theory of Nostalgic Consumption

Ela Veresiu, York University, Canada
Ana Babic Rosario, University of Denver
Thomas Derek Robinson, City University of London, UK

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.