Improving Civil Discourse: Speaking Is a More Civil Form of Discourse Than Writing

To improve civil discourse and “humanize” ideological opponents, is it better to speak or write? In two experiments (n=800), people reported preferring to write (vs. speak) to an opponent to diminish conflict. But six experiments with real interactions (n=2,350) suggest that speaking is more humanizing—and less conflict-ridden—than writing.



Citation:

Juliana Schroeder (2019) ,"Improving Civil Discourse: Speaking Is a More Civil Form of Discourse Than Writing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 45-50.

Authors

Juliana Schroeder, University of California Berkeley, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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