Pride & Prejudice: How an Individual’S Hubris Makes Them Say Bad Things About Your Brand

This research develops and tests a novel prediction that hubristic pride can increase negative word of mouth following a service failure. Results from six experiments show that the effect of hubristic pride is driven by increased psychological entitlement.



Citation:

Felix Septianto, Gavin Northey, Tung Moi Chiew, Vicki Andonopoulos, and Liem Viet Ngo (2019) ,"Pride & Prejudice: How an Individual’S Hubris Makes Them Say Bad Things About Your Brand", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 840-841.

Authors

Felix Septianto, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Gavin Northey, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Tung Moi Chiew, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia
Vicki Andonopoulos, University of New South Wales, Australia
Liem Viet Ngo, University of New South Wales, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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