When Bad News Is Good

When facing a difficult decision (e.g., whether to have surgery), people may prefer worse news (“your injury is severe”) to better news (“your injury is moderate”). This is because bad news often guides subsequent actions (“you must have surgery”)—even when such actions are non-preferred—enabling difficult decisions to be preemptively avoided.



Citation:

Kate Barasz and Serena Hagerty (2019) ,"When Bad News Is Good", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 444-445.

Authors

Kate Barasz, Harvard Business School, USA
Serena Hagerty, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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