When a Brand Betrayed Me: How Brand Betrayal Increases Consumer Self-Disclosure For Future Personalized Offerings

This study reveals a positive effect of brand betrayal on consumer responses. Consumers with strong self-brand connection experience high cognitive dissonance when a brand they care for betrays them, while self-disclosure helps them reduce this dissonance, and subsequently, they perceive the brand’s future personsalized offering to be more attractive.



Citation:

Teck Ming Tan, Jari Salo, and Jaakko Aspara (2019) ,"When a Brand Betrayed Me: How Brand Betrayal Increases Consumer Self-Disclosure For Future Personalized Offerings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 866-867.

Authors

Teck Ming Tan, University of Oulu, Finland
Jari Salo, University of Helsinki, Finland
Jaakko Aspara, Hanken School of Economics, Finland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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