The False Negative Rate of Confound Checks and Why You Should Not Use the Panas to Exclude Mood Effects

Researcher degrees of freedom increase the false positive rate. However, for confound checks such freedom actually increases the false negative rate. A study on how mood is used as a confound check in consumer research and psychology indeed finds that mood is often measured with questionable validity, reliability, and sensitivity.



Citation:

Niels van de Ven (2019) ,"The False Negative Rate of Confound Checks and Why You Should Not Use the Panas to Exclude Mood Effects", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 887-887.

Authors

Niels van de Ven, Tilburg University, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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