The False Negative Rate of Confound Checks and Why You Should Not Use the Panas to Exclude Mood Effects

Researcher degrees of freedom increase the false positive rate. However, for confound checks such freedom actually increases the false negative rate. A study on how mood is used as a confound check in consumer research and psychology indeed finds that mood is often measured with questionable validity, reliability, and sensitivity.



Citation:

Niels van de Ven (2019) ,"The False Negative Rate of Confound Checks and Why You Should Not Use the Panas to Exclude Mood Effects", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 887-887.

Authors

Niels van de Ven, Tilburg University, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

F6. Can CSR Save a Firm From a Crisis? A Role of Gratitude in the Buffering Effect of CSR on Consumer Vindictive Behavior.

Junghyun Kim, NEOMA Business School
Taehoon Park, University of South Carolina, USA
Myungsuh Lim, Sangji University

Read More

Featured

When Does Slow Mean Luxurious?: The Effect of Product Motion Speed in Brand Communications on Status Perceptions

SungJin Jung, INSEAD, Singapore
David Dubois, INSEAD, France

Read More

Featured

Testing Theories of Goal Progress within Online Learning

Tong Lu, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Eric Bradlow, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Wesley Hutchinson, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.