The Indigenous Art Market: a Site of Cultural Production Or Cultural Assimilation?

Viewing the Australian Indigenous art market as a fugitive space opens possibilities for Indigenous artists and intermediaries to reassert their cultures and knowledge systems. Drawing on decolonization theory and multi-method data, we find that despite persisting cultural tensions, the market can empower the cultural production and resurgence of Indigenous people.



Citation:

Ai Ming Chow, Michal Carrington, and Julie L. Ozanne (2019) ,"The Indigenous Art Market: a Site of Cultural Production Or Cultural Assimilation?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 315-319.

Authors

Ai Ming Chow, University of Melbourne, Australia
Michal Carrington, University of Melbourne, Australia
Julie L. Ozanne, University of Melbourne, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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