Racialized Brands: a By-Product of Cultural Branding

Cultural branding researchers have yet to critically interrogate how racialized brands persist despite minority-group consumer activist calls for change. Building on justification theory and a multi-actor ethnography of Knorr Gypsy Sauce in Germany reveals that exoticized brand markers are maintained through a depoliticizing process, which I term myth market justification.



Citation:

Ela Veresiu (2019) ,"Racialized Brands: a By-Product of Cultural Branding", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 315-319.

Authors

Ela Veresiu, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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