When Robots Come to Our Rescue: Why Professional Service Robots Aren’T Inspiring and Can Demotivate Consumers’ Pro-Social Behaviors

Six studies demonstrate that consumers feel less inspired when reading about a robot carrying out a disaster relief act than reading about a human carrying out the same act because robots are perceived to lack autonomy. The low feeling of inspiration can affect consumers’ subsequent contribution in unrelated prosocial domains.



Citation:

Szu-chi Huang and Fangyuan Chen (2019) ,"When Robots Come to Our Rescue: Why Professional Service Robots Aren’T Inspiring and Can Demotivate Consumers’ Pro-Social Behaviors", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 93-98.

Authors

Szu-chi Huang, Stanford University, USA
Fangyuan Chen, Hong Kong Polytechic University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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