The Transcendent Self: the Influence of Exposure to Nature on Self-Serving Versus Pro-Social Consumption

We show that exposure to nature makes people more willing to make prosocial consumption choices in ways that incur personal costs to help others. This effect is mediated by self-transcendence—a sense of being connected to something greater than oneself. Field and lab studies demonstrate the effect and one boundary condition.



Citation:

Noah Castelo, Miranda Goode, and Katherine White (2019) ,"The Transcendent Self: the Influence of Exposure to Nature on Self-Serving Versus Pro-Social Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 93-98.

Authors

Noah Castelo, Columbia University, USA
Miranda Goode, Ivey Business School, Canada
Katherine White, University of British Columbia, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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