How Do You Like That One? Or Which Do You Like Better?: Being Asked to Evaluate Options in Isolation Or Pairwise and the Probability of Order-Effects-In-Choice

Three studies demonstrate that the likelihood of order-effects-in-choice can depend on whether a consumer is guided to follow an evaluation strategy that is congruent with their natural strategy. We demonstrate the role of attention in mediating this effect, identifying salesperson interventions that can both increase and decrease order-effects-in-choice.



Citation:

Matthew Philp and Antonia Mantonakis (2019) ,"How Do You Like That One? Or Which Do You Like Better?: Being Asked to Evaluate Options in Isolation Or Pairwise and the Probability of Order-Effects-In-Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 811-812.

Authors

Matthew Philp, HEC Montreal, Canada
Antonia Mantonakis, Brock University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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