Injudicious Disclosure

People like to think they have control over the information they share with others, but people will sometimes injudiciously disclose information they should have kept to themselves. In five experiments we find evidence suggesting that arousal increases the likelihood of disclosing information at inopportune moments.



Citation:

Brent Lynn Selby Coker and Ann Lisa McGill (2019) ,"Injudicious Disclosure", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47, eds. Rajesh Bagchi, Lauren Block, and Leonard Lee, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 523-523.

Authors

Brent Lynn Selby Coker, University of Melbourne, Australia
Ann Lisa McGill, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 47 | 2019



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