Q6. Online Social Status Predicts Subjective Well-Being: a Two Population Study

Through three studies across two populations, we identified a novel construct: online social status. Online social status is positively related to consumers’ subjective well-being (Study 1 and Study 2). Additionally, only when online and offline identities were highly overlapped, online social status is related to subjective well-being (Study 3).



Citation:

Rui Du and Miao Hu (2018) ,"Q6. Online Social Status Predicts Subjective Well-Being: a Two Population Study", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 904-904.

Authors

Rui Du, University of Hawaii, USA
Miao Hu, University of Hawaii, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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