Perceptions of Epistemic Vs. Aleatory Uncertainty Affect Stock Investment

Investors’ perceptions of uncertainty vary along two independent dimensions: (i) epistemic (knowable) uncertainty; and (ii) aleatory (random) uncertainty. The more investors perceive market uncertainty to be epistemic (aleatory), the more sensitive they are to their own level of ignorance (risk preference), and they manage this uncertainty by seeking advice (diversifying).



Citation:

Daniel Walters, Gulden Ulkumen, Carsten Erner, David Tannebaum, and Craig Fox (2018) ,"Perceptions of Epistemic Vs. Aleatory Uncertainty Affect Stock Investment", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 833-834.

Authors

Daniel Walters, INSEAD, France
Gulden Ulkumen, University of Southern California, USA
Carsten Erner, FS Card
David Tannebaum, University of Utah, USA
Craig Fox, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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