Product Ethicality Dilemma: Consumer Reactions to 'Disgusting' Recycled Products

We demonstrate that disgust associated with recycled products decreases product ethicality perceptions and attitudes. Interestingly, although individuals low in moral identity internalization perceive ‘non-disgusting’ recycled product and ‘disgusting’ recycled products as equally ethical, individuals high in moral identity internalization perceive ‘non-disgusting’ recycled products as more ethical than ‘disgusting’ recycled products.



Citation:

Berna Basar and Sankar Sen (2018) ,"Product Ethicality Dilemma: Consumer Reactions to 'Disgusting' Recycled Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 473-475.

Authors

Berna Basar, Baruch College, USA
Sankar Sen, Baruch College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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