The Effect of Future Focus on Self-Control Is Moderated By Self-Efficacy

We demonstrate that the effects of future focus on self-control are moderated by self-efficacy. For those who are high (low) in perceived self-efficacy, focusing on the future leads to lower (higher) self-control. This occurs because future focus causes those high (low) in self-efficacy to visualize successful coping behavior (goal failure).



Citation:

Rafay A Siddiqui, Jane Park, and Frank May (2018) ,"The Effect of Future Focus on Self-Control Is Moderated By Self-Efficacy", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 792-793.

Authors

Rafay A Siddiqui, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Jane Park, University of California Riverside, USA
Frank May, Virginia Tech, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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