J4. a Large Pack of Toilet Paper Is Bad For Me: Self-Control and Consumers’ Responses to Product Quantity

We examine the association between product quantity and self-control using utilitarian products, a product domain that does not generally threaten self-control. We find a bidirectional effect between product quantity and self-control, whereby exposures to large product quantity decrease self-control, and activation of self-control decreases evaluation of product quantity.



Citation:

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Keith Wilcox, and Amy Dalton (2018) ,"J4. a Large Pack of Toilet Paper Is Bad For Me: Self-Control and Consumers’ Responses to Product Quantity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 918-918.

Authors

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Keith Wilcox, Columbia University, USA
Amy Dalton, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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