Increasing Tax Salience Alters Investment Behavior

In a field experiment with an online investment advisor, we examine the effect of highlighting tax consequences of portfolio allocation changes before investors commit to the change. Allocation changes drop significantly when investors are notified of taxes owed. We provide evidence that this pattern is specific to taxes.



Citation:

Abigail Sussman, Daniel Egan, and Sam Swift (2018) ,"Increasing Tax Salience Alters Investment Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 23-27.

Authors

Abigail Sussman, University of Chicago, USA
Daniel Egan, Betterment
Sam Swift, Bowery Farming



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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