Emotion, Scientific Reasoning, and Judgments of Scientific Evidence

We examine how consumers’ ability to reason about and emotional reactions to scientific evidence relate to their judgments of it. In an online study, reasoning ability and emotional reactions to controversial research separately predicted understanding of it, judgments of its quality, and trust in the scientists who conducted it.



Citation:

Caitlin Drummond and Baruch Fischhoff (2018) ,"Emotion, Scientific Reasoning, and Judgments of Scientific Evidence", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 115-120.

Authors

Caitlin Drummond, University of Michigan, USA
Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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