Moral Arguments Are Most Persuasive in Changing Attitudes of Opponents of Genetically Modified Foods

Across 4 studies, we systematically examine which types of arguments cause opponents of GMO foods to change their minds. Moral arguments shifted opponents’ attitudes more than arguments about its safety, naturalness, or acceptability in Christian doctrine, which is consistent with the possibility that attitudes are based on the moralization of GMO foods.



Citation:

Sydney Scott, Yoel Inbar, and Paul Rozin (2018) ,"Moral Arguments Are Most Persuasive in Changing Attitudes of Opponents of Genetically Modified Foods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 115-120.

Authors

Sydney Scott, Washington University, USA
Yoel Inbar, University of Toronto, Canada
Paul Rozin, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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