“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance

Consumers associated circular shapes with a greater sense of completeness. Having a set of items placed in a circular (vs. angular) shape increases the perceived completeness of the set, and consequently increases the perceived importance of each component. Distinctive visual cues and item familiarity moderate the shape effect.



Citation:

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, Xiuping Li, and aradhna krishna (2018) ,"“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 154-159.

Authors

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Xiuping Li, National University of Singapore, Singapore
aradhna krishna, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A3. Why People Still Do Not Trust Algorithmic Advice in Decision Making

JAEWON HWANG, Sejong University
Dong Il Lee, Sejong University

Read More

Featured

Self-Producer`s Journey: Identity Construction and Transformation in Self-Production

S. Sinem Atakan, Ozyegin University, Turkey
Mina Seraj, Ozyegin University, Turkey

Read More

Featured

When News Gets Personal: The Evolution of Content in the Successive Retelling of Events

Shiri Melumad, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Yoon Duk Kim, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Robert Meyer, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Ani Nenkova, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.