“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance

Consumers associated circular shapes with a greater sense of completeness. Having a set of items placed in a circular (vs. angular) shape increases the perceived completeness of the set, and consequently increases the perceived importance of each component. Distinctive visual cues and item familiarity moderate the shape effect.



Citation:

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, Xiuping Li, and aradhna krishna (2018) ,"“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 154-159.

Authors

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Xiuping Li, National University of Singapore, Singapore
aradhna krishna, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Consumer Response to Innovations: The Differential Effects of Focused and Defocused Attention on Perceived Novelty, Usefulness and Symbolism

Katarina Hellén, Univeristy of Vaasa
Maria Sääksjärvi, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

Di$tance

Evan Polman, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Sam J. Maglio, University of Toronto Scarborough

Read More

Featured

If No One Saw It on Instagram, Was It Any Good? Examining Received Attention as a Social Benefit of Experiential Consumption

Matthew J Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Jamie D. Hyodo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.