“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance

Consumers associated circular shapes with a greater sense of completeness. Having a set of items placed in a circular (vs. angular) shape increases the perceived completeness of the set, and consequently increases the perceived importance of each component. Distinctive visual cues and item familiarity moderate the shape effect.



Citation:

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, Xiuping Li, and aradhna krishna (2018) ,"“But, Will You Think It's Important to Use Mouthwash?” How Visual Communication of a Set Impacts Perceived Set Completeness and Item Importance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 154-159.

Authors

Miaolei (Liam) Jia, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Xiuping Li, National University of Singapore, Singapore
aradhna krishna, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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