J1. the Effect of Identity Abstractness on Information Processing Styles

This study suggests that how a social identity is construed (i.e., identity abstractness) would influence one’s information processing style. Specifically, we predict that, when a social identity with high (vs. low) identity abstractness is activated, a person is likely to process information more abstractly (vs. concretely).



Citation:

Woojin Choi, Min Jung Kim, HyukJin Kwon, and Jiyun Kang (2018) ,"J1. the Effect of Identity Abstractness on Information Processing Styles", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 902-902.

Authors

Woojin Choi, University of Seoul
Min Jung Kim, Manhattan College
HyukJin Kwon, University of Seoul
Jiyun Kang, Texas State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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