Asymmetry in Susceptibility to Fake News Due to Political Orientation

The current research demonstrates that Republicans’ acceptance of ambiguous claims as true and reduction in vigilance are greater when they are in the presence of other Republicans. This effect appears to be driven by a greater level of shared reality and higher perceived consensus when they are amongst other Republicans.



Citation:

Hyerin Han, Ryan Wang, and Akshay Rao (2018) ,"Asymmetry in Susceptibility to Fake News Due to Political Orientation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 138-143.

Authors

Hyerin Han, University of Minnesota, USA
Ryan Wang, University of Minnesota, USA
Akshay Rao, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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