Can “Related Articles” Correct Misperceptions From False Information on Social Media?

Preliminary findings from two experiments suggest that “related articles” do not reduce belief in headlines that match the reader’s political ideology. Debunking articles do, however, decrease belief in mismatched headlines, suggesting that belief in fake news can be lowered through debunking only if prior beliefs are low to begin with.



Citation:

Yu Ding, Mira Mayrhofer, and Gita Venkataramani Johar (2018) ,"Can “Related Articles” Correct Misperceptions From False Information on Social Media?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 138-143.

Authors

Yu Ding, Columbia University, USA
Mira Mayrhofer, University of Vienna
Gita Venkataramani Johar, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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