Can Fear Be Eaten? Emotional and Behavioral Consequences of Intake of Fear-Inducing Food Or Drink

This paper examines the impacts of the intake of fear-inducing food on people’s reactions to prior and future fearful experiences. Results of three experiments confirm our counterintuitive prediction that the intake of fear-inducing food can reduce fear and increase tolerance of the threat. Self-confidence is a mediator to explain such effects.



Citation:

Jiangang Du, Qiuying Zheng, Michael K. Hui, and Xiucheng Fan (2018) ,"Can Fear Be Eaten? Emotional and Behavioral Consequences of Intake of Fear-Inducing Food Or Drink", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 529-529.

Authors

Jiangang Du, Nankai University
Qiuying Zheng, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine
Michael K. Hui, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Xiucheng Fan, Fudan University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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