J13. the Good and Bad of a Delayed Indulgence: Effects on Self-Perceptions and Purchase Satisfaction

We show that the mere act of delaying an indulgent purchase can evoke the same level of perceived self-control as not indulging at all –a level that is higher than in instances of immediate indulgence. Paradoxically, the bolstered perceptions of self-control resulting from a delayed indulgence, subsequently reduce purchase satisfaction.



Citation:

Argiro Kliamenakis and Kamila Sobol (2018) ,"J13. the Good and Bad of a Delayed Indulgence: Effects on Self-Perceptions and Purchase Satisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 914-914.

Authors

Argiro Kliamenakis, Concordia University, Canada
Kamila Sobol, Concordia University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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