Is Warm Always Trusting? the Effect of Seasonality on Trustworthiness

In contrast to past research that has equated warm temperatures with individuals being more trusting, we find that the trustworthiness is a function of the incongruence between inside and outside temperatures (i.e., season). We show this effect in multiple experiments and a longitudinal study.



Citation:

Gretchen Wilroy, Margaret Meloy, and Simon Blanchard (2018) ,"Is Warm Always Trusting? the Effect of Seasonality on Trustworthiness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 857-858.

Authors

Gretchen Wilroy, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Margaret Meloy, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Simon Blanchard, Georgetown University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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