Inside Jokes: Humor As Social Exclusion

Humor can bring people together; we suggest it can also be used to divide. We find that inside jokes—humor attempts that require prior knowledge available to only some group members—are common, lead to feelings of ostracism, and can have unforeseen negative consequences for group dynamics.



Citation:

Ovul Sezer, Brad Bitterly, Alison Wood Brooks, Maurice Schweitzer, and Michael Norton (2018) ,"Inside Jokes: Humor As Social Exclusion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 28-32.

Authors

Ovul Sezer, University of North Carolina, USA
Brad Bitterly, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Alison Wood Brooks, Harvard Business School, USA
Maurice Schweitzer, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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