Attribution of Authenticity: the Benefits of Self-Disclosure of Unfavorable Information

We demonstrate that incorporating unfavorable information (vs. no unfavorable information) in self-disclosure increases perceptions of an individual’s authenticity and results in favorable impressions and more trusting behavior in an economic game. Our proposed positive outcomes occur in situations where self-disclosure is voluntary (vs. requested).



Citation:

Li Jiang, Maryam Kouchaki, and Francesca Gino (2018) ,"Attribution of Authenticity: the Benefits of Self-Disclosure of Unfavorable Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 616-617.

Authors

Li Jiang, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Maryam Kouchaki, Northeastern University, USA
Francesca Gino, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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