C5. Krabby Patties, Kelp Chips, Or Kitkats?: Exploring the Depictions of Food Featured in Children’S Television Shows  

Time spent watching TV may contribute to unhealthy eating, yet most studies only review food advertising. We examine food and beverage references within 64.5 hours of children’s television programs. Our results show prevalence of un-branded and less healthy food and beverages primarily as snacks. Ramifications for child obesity are discussed.



Citation:

Kathy Tian, Regina Ahn, and Michelle Renee Nelson (2018) ,"C5. Krabby Patties, Kelp Chips, Or Kitkats?: Exploring the Depictions of Food Featured in Children’S Television Shows  ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 930-930.

Authors

Kathy Tian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Regina Ahn, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Michelle Renee Nelson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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