Causes and Consequences of the Expense Prediction Bias

The present research develops, tests, and validates a simple cognitive tool that markedly improves consumers’ expense prediction accuracy. Underlining the importance of this tool, we also provide evidence that EPB is associated with lower savings and higher debt.



Citation:

Chuck Howard, David Hardisty, Abigail Sussman, and Melissa Knoll (2018) ,"Causes and Consequences of the Expense Prediction Bias", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 247-251.

Authors

Chuck Howard, University of British Columbia, Canada
David Hardisty, University of British Columbia, Canada
Abigail Sussman, University of Chicago, USA
Melissa Knoll, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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