The Effect of Fertility on Women’S Word-Of-Mouth Behavior

Current research examines a hidden biological factor that may influence women’s desire to share WOM: ovulatory-cycle (high vs low fertility). Four studies showed that women express greater desire to share information near ovulation. However, the fertility-regulated-increase in desire to share information was specific to sharing with other women, not men.



Citation:

Sevincgul Ulu, Kristina Durante, Jonah Berger, and Aekyoung Kim (2018) ,"The Effect of Fertility on Women’S Word-Of-Mouth Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 819-820.

Authors

Sevincgul Ulu, Rutgers University, USA
Kristina Durante, Rutgers University, USA
Jonah Berger, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Aekyoung Kim, Rutgers University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

When Implementation Intentions Backfire: Illusion of Goal Progress in Financial Decisions

Linda Court Salisbury, Boston College, USA
Gergana Y. Nenkov, Boston College, USA
Min Zhao, Boston College, USA

Read More

Featured

A11. When Political Neutrality Backfires

Ike Silver, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Alex Shaw, University of Chicago, USA
Rob Kurzban, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Featured

Restrained by Resources: The Joint Effect of Scarcity Cues and Childhood Socioeconomic Status (SES) on Consumer Preference for Feasibility

Lili Wang, Zhejiang University
Yanfen You, New Mexico State University, USA
Chun-Ming Yang, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.