The Ex-Money Effect: When and Why People Feel Connected to Outcomes That Involve Money They Previously Had

We document the ex-money effect that people feel connected to outcomes that involve money they previously had (their “ex-money”), and suggest this counter-normative effect stems from people conceptualizing money as a non-fungible material good. We document its boundary condition and discuss using it as a low-friction, minimalistic nudge.



Citation:

Charis Li and Yanping Tu (2018) ,"The Ex-Money Effect: When and Why People Feel Connected to Outcomes That Involve Money They Previously Had", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 298-302.

Authors

Charis Li, University of Florida, USA
Yanping Tu, University of Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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